KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

WALID RAAD

WALID RAAD

Walid Raad is an artist and an Associate Professor of Art in The Cooper Union (New York, USA). Raad’s works include The Atlas Group, a fifteen-year project between 1989 and 2004 about the contemporary history of Lebanon, and the ongoing projects Scratching on Things I Could Disavow and Sweet Talk: Commissions (Beirut). His books include The Truth Will Be Known When The Last Witness Is Dead, My Neck Is Thinner Than A Hair, Let’s Be Honest, The Weather Helped, and Scratching on Things I Could Disavow.

Raad’s works have been shown in the Louvre (Paris), Documenta 11 and 13 (Kassel, Germany), Kunsthalle Zurich (Zurich, Switzerland), The Whitechapel Art Gallery (London, UK), Festival d’Automne (Paris, France), Kunsten Festival des Arts (Brussels, Belgium), The Venice Biennale (Venice, Italy), The Hamburger Bahnhof (Berlin, Germany), Homeworks (Beirut, Lebanon) and numerous other museums and venues in Europe, the Middle East, and Americas.

Raad is also the recipient of the Hasselblad Award (2011), a Guggenheim Fellowship (2009), the Alpert Award in Visual Arts (2007), the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize (2007), and the Camera Austria Award (2005).

For additional information please visit: www.scratchingonthings.com / www.theatlasgroup.org / www.sfeir-semler.com / www.paulacoopergallery.com www.anthonyreynolds.com


JOHN TAGG

JOHN TAGG

 John Tagg was born in northern England but has lived and worked for almost thirty years in the United States, where he is presently Distinguished Professor of Art History and Comparative Literature at Binghamton University, State University of New York. After graduating from the Royal College of Art in London in the early 1970s, Tagg held teaching positions at St. Martin’s School of Art and the University of London Goldsmiths College before becoming the first Arts Council of Great Britain Fellow in Photographic History at the Polytechnic of Central London. He subsequently taught at the University of Leeds, playing a prominent role in the development of “the New Art History,” before moving to the United States, teaching first at UCLA and then at Binghamton. His work has been recognized by numerous prestigious fellowships in the U.S. and Europe and frequent invitations to lecture across the U.S., Europe, and Asia. His widely translated works include The Burden of Representation: Essays of Photographies and Histories (1988), Grounds of Dispute: Art History, Cultural Politics and the Discursive Field (1992) and The Disciplinary Frame: Photographic Truths and the Capture of Meaning (2009).